Yellow Ochre Carvings

Figure in Yellow Ochre - Day's Knob Archaeological Site    Figure in Yellow Ochre - Day's Knob Archaeological Site

Figure in Yellow Ochre - Day's Knob Archaeological Site    Figure in Yellow Ochre - Day's Knob Archaeological Site

Anthropomorphic and zoomorphic figures, a few of many in this material.

Worked chunks of yellow ochre (Fe2O3 H2O, hydrated iron oxide) appear frequently at the site, well removed from the geological context in which this material naturally occurs. The photo below shows a horizontally and vertically (lower) distant location at the site where the ochre appears naturally as a mass or nodules within highly ferrous red clay and associated with hematite rock.

The worked ochre appears randomly at the site, but in particular at one location on the northwest slope of the knob roughly half a meter (20") beneath the terrain surface (photo below), in soil within which this material simply does not occur naturally.  (Several hairs profes- sionally verified as human also appeared buried in this immediate area, unfortunately with no surviving DNA.)
 

Yellow ochre is light, porous, and easily pulverized, and has been used for many thousands of years as a bright and durable coloring agent.  This seems to be present in powdered form on some of the harder stone artifacts at the site, but spectroscopic analysis will be required to determine this with certainty.

 

Top of Page

Click your browser's "Back" button to return to the point from which you entered this page.

HOME